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FuelEU Maritime

31st Aug 2023

What is FuelEU Maritime?

FuelEU Maritime is a regulation which aims to support the decarbonization of the shipping industry. Upon entering into force from 1 January 2025, it will increase the share of renewable and low-carbon fuels in the fuel mix of international maritime transport in the European Union (EU).

The European Parliament (EP), Council of the European Union, and the European Commission (EC) have reached an agreement on the FuelEU Maritime regulation. The EP and Council are expected to formally adopt the revised regulation later in 2023.

As the final text is adopted, we at DNV will inform you of the further details on the requirements and processes, including all the related implementing and delegated acts.

FuelEU Maritime’s impact on shipping

In general, FuelEU Maritime sets well-to-wake greenhouse gas (GHG) emission intensity requirements on energy used on board ships trading in the EU from 2025. What’s more, it mandates the use of shore power for container and cruise ships in certain EU ports from 2030.

Greenhouse gas emissions must be below a required level

From 2025, for ships trading in the EU or European Economic Area (EEA), the yearly average GHG intensity of energy used on board, measured as GHG emissions per energy unit (gCO2e/MJ), needs to be below a required level.

The GHG emissions are calculated in a well-to-wake perspective, including emissions related to extraction, cultivation, production and transportation of the fuel, in addition to emissions from energy used on board the ship.

The FuelEU Maritime regulation also includes provisions for taking into account ships with wind-assisted propulsion.

FuelEU Maritime requirements based on percentage of energy used on voyages (image)
FuelEU Maritime requirements based on percentage of energy used on voyages

The GHG intensity requirement applies to 100% of energy used on voyages and port calls within the EU or EEA, and 50% of energy used on voyages into or out of the EU or EEA.

To avoid evasive behaviour, container ships stopping in transhipment ports outside the EU or EEA, but less than 300 nautical miles from an EU or EEA port, need to include 50% of the energy for the voyage to that port as well, rather than only the short leg from the transhipment port. The EU will provide a list of transhipment ports.

Container ships and passenger ships are required to connect to shore power

From 2030, container ships and passenger ships are required to connect to shore power when at berth for more than two hours in a Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) port.

From 2035, the requirement applies to all ports where shore power is available.